Sunday, 19 February 2012

Figs for Fig Jam


               
Over the last 10 years or so it's been lovely to see the gradual return of the birdlife to the suburbs of Melbourne. Its probably due in some part, to the reinvigoration of gardens and the planting of natives and other bird attracting plants.  The return of the parrot, although lovely to see in all their colourful glory, they are a menace to my fruit trees, especially as mine are limited in number.

This week my fig guard dog "Max" warned me that they were about - with his constant barking (he is always on the lookout for birds) and the neighbours really love this warning too!! NOT.  In response to his emphatic barking I ventured out and there was my fig tree covered in parrots. That was it - time to pick! 

The first flush of figs earlier in the year were very dry, even the birds didn't want them, but these were ripe and ready to eat.  I picked a couple of kilos to make jam.

Spring
Birds love figs


Time to pick before they are all gone!

So this morning I set about making Fig Jam. Its a simple recipe. I like to peel the figs as some of the skins are not very attractive.

Ingredients

1kg peeled figs - chopped - stalks removed
1kg sugar
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water

As is usual with making jam put two plates in the freezer.

Place the chopped figs, lemon juice and water in a large pan.

Bring to the boil then lower the heat and simmer, covered for 20 mins or until the figs are soft.

Add sugar and stir over a medium heat without boiling for about 5 mins or until the sugar has dissolved.

Then bring to the boil and boil for 20 mins stirring often.  

Remove any scum from the surface with a slotted spoon.  

Add a little water if the mixture gets too thick.

When thick and pulpy, start testing for setting point.








Remove from the heat, place a little jam on one of the cold plates and put in the freezer for 30 seconds.  when setting point is reached, a skin will form on the surface and the jam will wrinkle when pushed with your finger.  Remove any scum from the surface.
I have a large old fashioned preserving pan that I like to boil my jars in, you can sterilise them with boiling water or you can put them in the dishwasher.



 Pour the jam immediately into clean, warm jars and seal.  Turn the jars upside down for 2 minutes, turn them back up the right way and leave to cool.  Label and date. This jam can be stored in a cool dark place for 6-12 months.  Refrigerate after opening for up to 6 weeks (if it lasts that long).

I am entering this in Ren Behan's  Simple in Season Blog Event for February


Max the fig guard dog
Max loves figs too!
A pair of parrots in the gum tree at the
back of the garden

15 comments:

  1. Lovely looking jam - if I'm lucky enough to get some figs from my tree this year I shall make some of this too.

    Shame about the parrots - they are rather beautiful and I do love a bit of wildlife in the garden.

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  2. Yes me too, but between Parrots, Possums and Me its a race I can tell you!

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  3. You are blessed to live in an area were produce grows naturally, Since moving to Dubai, I miss that part of life "Fresh Produce"!! Love this recipe, Figs are said to be fruits of heaven, and I totally agree, they are superdelicious. I especially love Fig Jam with Cheese, YUM. Thanks for the recipe :)

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  4. Dima - so glad you liked the recipe - I would have thought that in your part of the world figs would be plentiful. Fig Jam and Cheese I agree goes together very well - although I didn't think about it until you mentioned it.

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  5. that's stunning magnolia! i actually only recently tried fig jam at a food market, it was set alongside cheese and it was delicious together! I'm so envious of your fresh figs and your jam!

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  6. Shu Han - life is full of little coincidences - glad you enjoyed the cheese and fig jam together. Go ahead make some of your own.

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  7. Oh! Yum! I love fig jam. I plan to make some in the summer in France, (were the figs are much cheaper!). Yours looks scrumptious. And I love the story of Max and the Parrots.

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    1. A trifle rushed - its a shame they are so expensive in the UK, we are so lucky to have inherited this very mature tree from the previous owners of our house, we take it for granted.

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  8. Wow what a wonderful post and a great story, I'm so glad you got most of the figs before the birds! Thank you so much for sending this across to the UK for Simple and in Season! Best wishes Ren x

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    1. thank you Ren, Glad it arrived OK we had a national internet outage in the middle of me trying to link!

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  9. Lovely fig jams! I really have to try & make this coming summer! Thanks for sharing your recipe! Have a lovely day! :)

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    1. Kit so nice of you to comment and Welcome! Have a go it is so good as an accompaniment to cheese instead of quince paste and cheaper!

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  10. Thank you so much for your welcome back comments, they ahve been most appreciated. Now onto the fig jam. I am loving it. I haven't had a fresh fig in a while. I will have to keep this recipe in mind, should I come across a load at the market.

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    1. Hope you are all unpacked and settled in. This jam was such a success I am sure you would love it.

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  11. Thank you again for entering this lovely recipe to Simple and in Season. I have posted a round up post today x

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